Fiction

February 2017

The Museum of Modern Love by Heather Rose Book Cover
Crimes of the father by Tom Keneally Cover

Children of the Church

'A continued exploration of how mortal weakness, religious ideals and institutional tyrannies are enmeshed has constituted the core of Tom Keneally's art over a long career.'

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The SRB is an initiative of The Writing and Society Research Centre at Western Sydney University

December 2016

The Underground Railroad by Colson Whitehead cover

Injuries and Usurpations

'There is no subject that exposes the tensions, hypocrisies and flat-out contradictions of the United States’ defining myths – manifest destiny, individual liberty, self-reliance, exceptionalism – as starkly as that of race. It is hardly surprising that some of the most trenchant critiques of the nation’s problematic relationship with its own ideals should be found in the work of African-American writers. Colson Whitehead’s The Underground Railroad and Paul Beatty’s satire The Sellout are unalike in almost every respect, but on this point they share a consciousness, if not exactly an attitude. They have a common set of underlying preoccupations, which follow from the obvious historical fact that the institution of slavery made a mockery of the nation’s declared allegiance to the ideals of freedom and equality. What both novelists address, in their very different ways, is the problem of a nation divided against itself, not simply in a material and tribal sense, but on the fundamental level of its founding ideology. Both recognise that its history of conquest, exploitation and systemic inequality generates a profound cognitive dissonance.'

Do not say we have nothing by Madeleine Thien book cover
So Much Smoke by Felix Calvino cover

Felix Calvino’s Lost Galicia

'Galicia is made strange through the English language; Australia is made strange by non-native English and a Galician worldview. In this collection, the teeming social world of the village takes over, threatening to spill beyond the boundaries of the short form. This collection firmly establishes Calvino as an English prose stylist. The influence of Anglophone modernist minimalism is apparent and appropriate. Through absence and implication, the stories register feelings of loss the characters themselves often lack the language to articulate. If, as Rosalía de Castro wrote, to sing of Galicia in the Galician language offers ‘consolation against evil, relief from pain,’ to write of it in English implies something else entirely.'