Emmett Stinson

Emmett Stinson

is Lecturer in English Literature at the University of Newcastle.


About Emmett Stinson

Emmett Stinson is Lecturer in English Literature at the University of Newcastle. His essays, reviews, and fiction have appeared in The Age, The Australian, The Big Issue, Kill Your Darlings, Meanjin, The Monthly, Overland, The Sleepers Almanac and many others. His collection of short stories, Known Unknowns (2010), was published by Affirm Press.


Articles about Emmett Stinson

Articles by Emmett Stinson

Cigarette smuggling with a book
Tilting at Windmills by Phillip Edmonds cover

Quiet Conversations in a Very Noisy Room

‘Whether or not literary magazines are idealistic enterprises, they are essential to contemporary literary culture.’ Emmett Stinson reviews Phillip Edmonds’ history of the Australian literary magazine alongside a crop of the latest lit mags.

Is It Fundable?

Tom McCarthy is an interesting writer. I mean this in a precise way: Sianne Ngai, in Our Aesthetic Categories defines the ‘interesting’ as an important contemporary aesthetic category that ‘has been associated with genres with an unusual investment in theory’.

A Million Windows by Gerald Murnane cover

Remote Viewing

As the narrator of A Million Windows repeatedly reaffirms, the most important compositional principle in Murnane’s work is a genuine and thoroughgoing respect for the space of fiction as something radically different from everyday reality.

The Letters of William Gaddis by Steven Moore (editor)

Late Recognition

The publication of The Letters of William Gaddis is significant because it presents the first direct and unveiled access to this ‘reclusive’ author.

In the Same Boat

Have Australians overcome the cultural cringe and learned, as Phillips hoped they would, ‘the art of being unselfconsciously ourselves’? I am less sanguine about rumours of cringe’s demise...I think an example of how the cringe currently operates can be found by examining an increasingly marginal – if symbolically important – cultural form: the single-author short story collection.