James Bradley

James Bradley

is an award-winning author and critic.


About James Bradley

James Bradley is an award-winning author and critic. His books include five, most recently Clade (2015) and the young adult novel, The Silent Invasion (2017), a book of poetry, Paper Nautilus (1994), and The Penguin Book of the Ocean (2010). He blogs at cityoftongues.com.


Articles about James Bradley

James Bradley: Fitting the Pieces Together

‘All books are a combination of R&D and crowd pleasing.’

Clade by James Bradley

The catastrophe business

The first scene in Clade is in Antarctica. It is the summer solstice, ‘the first intimation of the year’s long retreat into the dark’. Adam is a scientist and, in particular, a climate-change researcher. The urgency of this activity is underscored, not for the last time, in a novel that will let us consume our fill of human-assisted natural catastrophes ...

Articles by James Bradley

Writing on the Precipice

Quelccaya Glacier located in southern Peru in the Cordillera Vilcanota.
The Wolf Border by Sarah Hall Cover

Wolf, Hall

Like Hall’s previous novels, The Wolf Border is set in the high, wild border country of Cumbria and is deeply informed by the physical and social textures of the region.

The Book of Barely Imagined Beings: A 21st Century Bestiary by Caspar Henderson

The beginning is nigh

Book of Barely Imagined Beasts... takes the bestiaries of the Middle Ages and uses them as the model for an attempt to tease out the way animals (and the ways we choose to think about them) are integral to our understanding of ourselves and our place in the world.

The Crane Wife by Patrick Ness

Mono no aware

The Crane Wife begins with a moment pitched somewhere between comedy and wonder. In the small hours of the morning, 48-year-old George Duncan is woken unexpectedly. It is a sound that has awoken him – an ‘unearthly sound … a mournful shatter of frozen midnight falling to earth to pierce his heart and lodge there forever, never to move, never to melt’ – but George, being who he is, assumes it is his bladder.