Australian Fiction

September 2018

Whispering in the Wind by Alan Marshall

Great Galloping Bush Whiskers

'Like any self-respecting once-upon-a-time story, this one takes place in a world that is both strange and familiar, where the commonplace becomes magical and the most remarkable things are normal. Our hero, Peter, is a young boy who dwells in a snug little bark hut deep in the bush with Crooked Mick, an old bushman and the greatest buckjump rider in all the world.'

Dyschronia by Jennifer Mills

The End of the World As We Know It

'From Armageddon to Ragnarok and the Rapture, humans persist in imagining the end of the world. The religious term is eschatology, and the literary terms are many. Some are jocular (Disaster Porn), or precisely denote a sub-genre (Post-Apocalypse, Solarpunk). Climate change or Anthropocene fiction is the latest variant on the theme, and if we believe our scientists — and woe betide us if we do not — these may be the final words.'

The Death of Noah Glass by Gail Jones

Figures in Geometry: The Death of Noah Glass by Gail Jones

'What we have entered here is a mise-en-abyme of ekphrasis: the text and images of one book, and the description of a painting in a notebook, all contained within another book, call up a cascade of images for the reader of this novel about art.'

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The SRB is an initiative of The Writing and Society Research Centre at Western Sydney University

August 2018

The Drover's Wife edited by Frank Moorhouse