Wayne Macauley

Wayne Macauley

is the author of four novels, Blueprints for a Barbed-Wire Canoe (2004), Caravan Story (2007), The Cook (2011) and Demons (2014), and the short fiction collection Other Stories (2010).


About Wayne Macauley

Wayne Macauley is the author of four novels, Blueprints for a Barbed-Wire Canoe (2004), Caravan Story (2007), The Cook (2011) and Demons (2014), and the short fiction collection Other Stories (2010). He has been shortlisted for the Victorian and Queensland Premier’s Literary Awards, the Western Australian Premier’s Book Award and the Melbourne Prize Best Writing Award.


Articles about Wayne Macauley

The Other Way, The Other Truth, The Other Life: Simpson Returns

When we are faced with a world whose problems all seem ‘wicked’ and intractable, what is it that fiction can do? Isn’t it always more useful to confront real instances of the problems we face through journalism, political essays and opinion pieces, or non-fictional representations of lived experiences of all kinds? Won’t those kinds of non-fictional intervention be more useful? At the very least if one is to attempt to engage with these things via fiction shouldn’t the mode the writer uses be sombre realism? Isn’t the mode of satire, which derives its impact in large part through humour (however dark), simply disrespectful of the enormity of suffering that is being experienced? Isn’t it inconsequential in relation to how actual problems might actually be solved?

Some Tests by Wayne Macauley

Not The End: Some Tests
by Wayne Macauley

'Macauley’s novels are often fantastical or absurd in their logic, but the colours and settings seem deliberately banal – focusing as they do on the type of place under-studied in Australian literature. Macauley frames these exurban fringes from vantage points and under circumstances that expose how cold and labyrinthine our modern civilization can be; he sheds light on how unhomely the city is when you’re on the wrong side of a picket fence.'

Demons by Wayne Macauley

Enter the swine: Demons by Wayne Macauley

In appropriating Demons for the title of his fourth novel, Wayne Macauley alludes not only to Dostoevsky’s Demons (which he also quotes in the Pevear and Volokhonsky translation), but to the title’s biblical provenance. Near the end of Macauley’s Demons, in the holiday house off the Great Ocean Road where he traps his characters for the weekend, a secret is exposed and the cabin fever gives way to a physical confrontation.

Articles by Wayne Macauley

Little Man, What Now? by Hans Fallada cover

Little people, big times: Little Man, What Now? by Hans Fallada

When Fallada handed the final draft of Little Man, What Now? to Rowohlt in early 1932 there were eight and half million people unemployed in Germany. By 1933, a staggering 40 per cent of the population was registered as out of work.